Timestamp: Twenty-Fifth Series Summary

 Doctor Who: Twenty-Fifth Series Summary

 

A stunning jump as we race toward the classic finish.

The Seventh Doctor’s second outing was a major step up, which was an important move for the show’s silver anniversary. It has also made me really love Sylvester McCoy’s wit and humor. Remembrance of the Daleks was a great start, and while Silver Nemesis was effectively Remembrance Redux, it was still fun. Even the average stories kept me entertained, and there didn’t seem to be a stinker in the bunch.

The John Nathan-Turner problems remain, and they’re likely to stick around for McCoy’s senior season, but at least the actors and stories were able to enlighten and entertain, overcoming the production.

Overall, this season ends up in a five-way tie for fifth place, joining the ranks of the Seventh, Tenth, Thirteenth, and Fourteenth seasons. The Third and Fourth Doctors are good company to be in.

 

Remembrance of the Daleks – 5
The Happiness Patrol – 3
Silver Nemesis – 4
The Greatest Show in the Galaxy –  3

Series Twenty-Five Average Rating: 3.8/5

 

 

UP NEXT – Doctor Who: Battlefield

 

The Timestamps Project is an adventure through the televised universe of Doctor Who, story by story, from the beginning of the franchise. For more reviews like this one, please visit the project’s page at Creative Criticality.

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2 thoughts on “Timestamp: Twenty-Fifth Series Summary

  1. I may have mentioned this before, but I’m going to defend JNT here. He knew that his heart wasn’t in things anymore, and he wanted to leave. The BBC told him that there were no producers who wanted to touch Who (a lie according to other producers at the BBC who have since spoken out) and that if he left the show would be canceled. He did NOT want to be known as the producer who killed Doctor Who, so he stayed. I won’t disagree that his era had issues, but I feel like fandom gives him a lot less credit than he deserves. Without him I think the show would have been canceled a lot sooner than it was.

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